Welcome!

ImageWelcome to Verdigris. This site provides information about environmental initiatives for the international printing community. It has a range of articles and reference links for printers, publishers, technology providers and anyone else who’s interested.

Articles cover all sorts of topics from explaining the basics of carbon footprinting for printers, to describing how individual printing companies are doing their bit to minimise their impact on the envrionment. This is an educational site that includes reference material and links to industry associations and environmental organisations around the world.

Environmental news for drupa

medium_2015_Laurel B.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

Important as they might be to us as individuals, environmental impact mitigation and sustainability concerns have much lower priority when it comes to most businesses. Say what they like, but if supporting environmental initiatives means adding cost or inconvenience, most firms are unlikely to take them up. It’s a terrible thing to admit, but sadly that reality is the case in the graphics industry. And yet supporting sustainability and environmental impact mitigation in graphics production can save money and help process automation. This should help overcome perceptions of inconvenience too and yet it doesn’t.

National Development and Reform Commission

Laurel-2018.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) is following the European Union (EU) in committing to phase out single use plastics. The NDRC has announced a number of bans including of plastic bags and a cut of 30% in single use plastics in restaurants by 2025. Hotels must have stopped offering single use plastics by 2025 too, by when it will also be illegal to make and sell plastic bags that are less than 0.025mm thick.

Microsoft’s bold move

medium_laurel2015.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

Everyone in the graphics industry depends on Microsoft and Apple to provide the software infrastructure so vital to prepress and workflows. Apple’s commitment to environmental impact mitigation is extensively publicised but we hear relatively little from Microsoft on the matter. That changed with Microsoft’s recent announcement that it aims to be carbon negative by 2030. Even bolder, by 2050 Microsoft will “remove from the environment all the carbon the company has emitted either directly or by electrical consumption since it was founded in 1975”. This is quite extraordinary, not least because calculating “all the carbon” is a Herculean task on its own.

Reasons to be cheerful

medium_2015_Laurel B.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

Consolidation in the graphics industry has been a fact of life for many years now. It’s tempting to blame the losses on the onslaught of digital media and delivery, despite it’s heavy carbon footprint compared to print. Consolidation is tragic for its many victims and their families, but consolidation is not all bad for the industry. There are a couple of reasons for this. Most importantly, if brutally, consolidation takes inefficiency out of the market. And in times when cutting environmental impact is so important, efficiency enhances the survival chances of those printing and publishing companies who understand how to exploit technology and are in tune with the zeitgeist.

The European Union’s Green Deal

Laurel-2018.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

In December 2019, the European Union (EU) announced that it is investing €100 billion to become the world’s first climate-neutral continent by 2050. By climate-neutral the EU means that emissions will be balanced with the removal of warming gases from the atmosphere. This is an ambitious undertaking. Much of the funding will be directed at business and industry as part of the EU’s commitment to protect human life, animals and plants through reduced pollution. In addition the EU has aspirations to help companies become world leaders in clean technologies and products, and to manage the transition to climate neutrality with full inclusivity. This means that emissions are controlled balanced with ways of removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere. The €100 billion is only the start: the EU aims to mobilise an astonishing €1 trillion over the next decade to jumpstart the continent’s shift to a net-zero economy.

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