Articles

The following articles have been produced by the Verdigris Project. This material has been distributed to the Verdigris Publishing Network for use in their magazines and on their websites. This network includes approximately 30 titles throughout the world from Finland to Australia. If you would like to join the Verdigris Publishing Network (it’s free), please contact Laurel by going here and selecting "Verdigris Information".

Paperback Writers

medium_HP_T300_CPI Paris.jpgHP has recently published the results of its Life Cycle Assessment of different paperback book printing options. The comparative study, “The Environmental Case for Digitally Printed Books”, focuses on the US market but its reasoning is relevant for book markets around the world.

The basic conclusion, as you might expect from the title, is that digital printing is less damaging to the environment than the conventional sort. However the story isn’t quite that simple and book publishers should look closely at this report as part of their future publishing strategies. Publishers can use printing technology synergies to balance higher profitability with the need to reduce their environmental impact.

Sustainable standard

medium_Sustainability & 16759.jpgIt can be hard for individual printers to develop a measurable environmental policy but the forthcoming ISO 16759 should address this.

For a growing number of printers, sustainability and working to protect the environment are becoming more important. This is not just because many printing company owners believe in helping the industry to be more environmentally friendly, but also because their customers are putting them under increased pressure to do so. Print buyers want to know that their media investments can make some contribution to their own corporate sustainability message. This matters more and more to their employees, to their shareholders and of course to consumers.

Carbon Conundrums

medium_PrintCity Carbon Footprint Report_EN.jpgPrintCity, the nebulous alliance of industry suppliers offering advice to the industry, has published another of its cross industry special reports. This one is called “Carbon Footprinting & Energy Reduction” and we were flattered to have had the chance to peer review it. We also provided reference material for the authors through the Verdigris project, some of which is included in the report.

Pulp Fiction

medium_ARJOtruckwithbaleofwastepaper.jpgThe ability to deink and recycle paper makes it a very environmentally friendly solution, but will the increasing use of inkjet printers threaten this?

Paper accounts for the biggest impact of the printing process on the environment so one of the most obvious ways of reducing that impact is to use recycled paper. This can cut down the amount of energy and water needed to produce the paper in the first place, as well as generating less greenhouse gases. There are plenty of recycling mills that specialise in pulping used paper, removing ink and other contaminants from it and using it to make new paper.

Right of bills

medium_EU Flag.jpgShould a state intervene to decide the format of the invoices that companies issue to their customers?

At the beginning of December last year the European Commission issued a communication called Reaping the Benefits of Electronic Invoicing for Europe. Electronic invoicing is part of the Commission’s Digital Agenda for Europe which assumes a single digital market. The EU wants to see e-invoicing become the dominant method of billing by 2020, not just for the Commission but for all businesses, large and small, right across the EU. Currently only 5% of all business to business invoicing is solely electronic so this is either going to be a big undertaking or an expensive waste of public money.

Deal or No Deal?

medium_Me & HRH.jpgWe recently participated in a climate change event sponsored by HRH the Prince of Wales’ Corporate Leaders Group on Climate Change. Apart from being completely baffled as to why we were invited, we were even more shocked that not a single printer or publisher was present amongst 200 business leaders. How can this industry hold its own against stiff competition from alternative media and against charges of environmental hostility, without engaging with government and NGOs?

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