The Weekly Verdigris Blog by Laurel Brunner

This article was produced by the Verdigris project, an industry initiative intended to raise awareness of print’s positive environmental impact. This weekly commentary helps printing companies keep up to date with environmental standards, and how environmentally friendly business management can help improve their bottom lines. Verdigris is supported by the following companies: Agfa Graphics, EFI, Fespa, HP, Kodak, Kornit, Ricoh, Spindrift, Splash PR, Unity Publishing and Xeikon.

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European Union Ecolabel getting tighter

medium_laurel2015.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

Earlier this year the European Union (EU) published some updates to its ecolabelling criteria. The updates reflect responses to consultations with businesses and other stakeholders, and most of them are pretty unexciting. But there are some points that graphics professionals might want to know about, since these changes make a positive push to improving efficiencies and sustainability in paper production.

Round and round goes plastic and print

medium_2015_Laurel B.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

The circular economy is rapidly moving from being the preserve of green activists and investors out into the mainstream. The idea that everything we use should be reused as a new raw material has huge implications for the environment and of course for climate change. But making real changes, the pragmatics of developing circular economy realities, is even more huge and for most of us pretty daunting.

Paper industry lagging

Laurel-2018.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

Sad to say the paper industry is still one of the world’s top polluters, alongside steel and energy producers. According to the European Union’s (EU) Science hub the sector is still Europe’s fourth largest polluter and yet it could be doing far more to reduce its emissions. Paper is based on a renewable resource so it is readily recyclable, but as the conversation shifts away from that argument, printed paper is under further threat. Sustainable or not won’t matter, if the pulp and paper sector fails to rouse itself. Regulation beckons if pollution related to pulp and paper production fails to fall.

Substrate recycling innovations from print provider

medium_laurel2015.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

We tend to expect the makers of substrates to be the ones who come up with affordable and recyclable materials, but Australia’s Cactus Imaging is putting those manufacturers to shame. Cactus Imaging is Australia’s market leader for large format digital print, with extensive international and domestic client bases. It has worked with a major customer to develop a recyclable billboard material that can replace PVC which is more commonly used in Australia.

Plastic packaging and recycling too simple a conversation

medium_2015_Laurel B.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

The enthusiasm for plastics reuse and recycling initiatives is a step in the right direction, but it overlooks the role of consumers. For most people understanding what can and cannot be recycled is difficult, so perhaps the graphics industry can help. Perhaps plastic materials that can be composted should be marked as such, and brand owners could consider expanding efforts to aid guidance.

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