The Weekly Verdigris Blog by Laurel Brunner

This article was produced by the Verdigris project, an industry initiative intended to raise awareness of print’s positive environmental impact. This weekly commentary helps printing companies keep up to date with environmental standards, and how environmentally friendly business management can help improve their bottom lines. Verdigris is supported by the following companies: Agfa Graphics, EFI, Fespa, HP, Kodak, Kornit, Ricoh, Spindrift, Splash PR, Unity Publishing and Xeikon.

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Design with the environment in mind

Laurel-2018.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

A couple of weeks ago we talked about the need for designers to think about the environment when planning media projects. This is especially important in the context of deinking and recycling. But it goes further than thinking about substrates, inks, energy and printing processes. Water solvents, transportation, packaging, all of them contribute to the environmental impact. Ultimately a media project’s design, including the printed components, determines a job’s environmental footprint.

Is it time to think bigger with eco labelling?

medium_laurel2015.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

Circular economies are all well and good, but it takes dialogue at many levels, not least between governments. The urgency of dealing with plastic waste was illustrated in a recent report that a small town in Malaysia has become a primary dumping ground for plastic waste. The place is being buried under 17,000 tonnes of the stuff. Some of the plastic is classified as clean and some of it isn’t and has to be processed in some other way. According to the United Nations Environment Programme “In 2015, 47 percent of the plastic waste generated worldwide was plastic packaging waste half of which came from Asia with China being the largest culprit. However the USA generates the most plastic packaging waste per person, with Japan and the European Union following.

Paper industry still falling behind

medium_2015_Laurel B.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

We’ve been working recently with people from the paper industry and it’s been enlightening. The paper business has a long and lofty history: it’s hundreds of years old; it’s been a terrific earner for its shareholders over the years; and it’s been a success story for most of its history. Like most other industrial sectors the paper industry has been profoundly affected by the internet. But unlike most other industrial sectors, it’s now on its knees.

Sustainability by design

Laurel-2018.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

All the talk about building circular economies can seem very remote from the day to day realities of living life and work’s daily grind. It’s easy to think of creating a circular economy as someone else’s gig. But that is too convenient and ultimately a little lazy because, as we know, everyone can make a difference even if it is only a very small one. In the graphics industry making a difference starts with design and being aware of how design decisions play out in the context of environmental impact.

Digital printing for textiles a bold new future

medium_laurel2015.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

Manufacturers of digital printing presses have been eyeing up the textile market for a while. Both direct-to-garment (DtG) printing and the printing of textiles for other purposes have been attracting attention. This makes sense given the range of technologies available and the dynamism in the digital printing business: everyone’s looking for that next killer application. Textile printing may well be it.

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