The Weekly Verdigris Blog by Laurel Brunner

This article was produced by the Verdigris project, an industry initiative intended to raise awareness of print’s positive environmental impact. This weekly commentary helps printing companies keep up to date with environmental standards, and how environmentally friendly business management can help improve their bottom lines. Verdigris is supported by the following companies: Agfa Graphics, EFI, Fespa, HP, Kodak, Kornit, Ricoh, Spindrift, Splash PR, Unity Publishing and Xeikon.

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It’s Still All About the Data

medium_laurel2015.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

For many years now the graphics industry has benefited from cloud computing, initially with the Software-as-a-Service model pioneered by Agfa and latterly with a growing range of subscriber based cloud services. Adobe started the cloud ball rolling some years ago with CSS subscriptions and HP has developed the industry’s most ambitious offering with its PrintOS service, available since 2016.

Spreading the sustainability message - Part 4

medium_2015_Laurel B.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

This is the fourth part of a series of blogs suggesting ideas for topics addressed in environmental policy statements. Industry associations serving the needs of journalists, illustrators, designers, authors, publishers, printers and so on are largely passive when it comes to improving environmental impacts. In the previous blogs we’ve considered the three Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, emissions controls and management and waste handling. But how about materials usage and considering what’s required to produce a given print product and its recycling?

Spreading the sustainability message - Part 3

Laurel-2018.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

In our first blog on getting industry associations to encourage wider sustainability awareness, we put the three Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, at the top of the list. But sector specific environmental impact and sustainability policy statements need much more. Graphic industry sectors such as newspapers, magazines, book and packaging production really should have robust environmental guidance from their associations. Sadly it’s largely absent from their websites and, even sadder, this is a missed opportunity. A high profile position on the environment helps the graphics industry to take ownership and lead the environmental impact conversation. It’s also useful reference for countering the negativity that is often associated with print in all its forms.

Spreading the sustainability message - Part 2

medium_laurel2015.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

This is the second part of a short series to provide industry associations with some basic ideas for how to encourage sustainability awareness amongst memberships. Environmental sustainability is becoming cool again as named brands, consumer associations, hotels and even banks start following the leads of governments and environmental groups. They’re doing this for commercial as well as sustainability reasons because sustainability messaging resonates with consumers. For people in the printing and publishing industry supply chains, this is especially important. Print still takes the rap for poorly handled waste, so messaging that improves how people use printed communications supports the graphics industry and its long term health, as well as reducing negative environmental impacts.

Spreading the sustainability message - Part 1

medium_2015_Laurel B.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

We’ve heard it from brands, environmental groups, consumer associations and governments and more recently credit card companies. They are all doing a great job at communicating the need to reduce Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions through reduced environmental impacts. But much more could be done and we see a massive opportunity for industry associations to take up the mantra and provide guidelines for their members.

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