The Weekly Verdigris Blog by Laurel Brunner

This article was produced by the Verdigris project, an industry initiative intended to raise awareness of print’s positive environmental impact. This weekly commentary helps printing companies keep up to date with environmental standards, and how environmentally friendly business management can help improve their bottom lines. Verdigris is supported by the following companies: Agfa Graphics, EFI, Fespa, Fujifilm, HP, Kodak, Miraclon, Ricoh, Spindrift, Splash PR, Unity Publishing and Xeikon.

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Electric delivers

Laurel-2018.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

For most print companies keen to improve their environmental impact, ideas start with the premises and kit. But we should all be thinking more about transportation’s impact, especially if the delivery fleet is large. Electric vehicles are becoming increasingly common and the number of manufacturers is growing. A recent addition to the clan is Volta Trucks a Swedish start up that has developed the world’s first electric 16 tonne delivery truck.

Diageo’s paper based spirits bottle

medium_laurel2015.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

Support for the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDG) is rising amongst brands responsible for high packaging volumes. In partnership with Pilot Lite Ventures, Diageo, one of the world’s largest booze brand owners, is developing a plastic-free bottle. The two companies have set up Pulpex to develop and supply the new paper-based bottles to Diageo owned brands as well as other large corporates including Unilever and Pepsico. The bottles will be trialed in the spring of 2021 with Diageo’s Johnnie Walker whisky expected to be the first Diageo drink to be sold in a paper bottle.

Customers starting to really care

medium_2015_Laurel B.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

We are seeing more and more companies starting to include sustainability as part of their investment decisions. This might be because their customers are asking the question, or because business owners recognise that sustainability in the graphics industry is everyone’s problem.

Graphics industry post Covid-19

Laurel-2018.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

Sadly we are seeing terrible effects of the Corornavirus crisis on the graphics industry, and clearly we can never expect a return to business as usual. Not a day passes without business failures, collapses, administration proceedings, closures, and the problem seems particularly acute for small businesses. These are the types of companies, often employing less than a dozen people, that make up the bulk of the worldwide graphics industry. Without these small to medium sized businesses, the traditional printing industry will look very different.

Heidelberg facing forwards

medium_laurel2015.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

Last November Heidelberg started reinventing itself for the digital age. Actually that isn’t quite right. Last November was a turning point because Heidelberg Druckmaschinen’s digital reinvention began earlier. The most visible indicator of that process was the company’s much vaunted relationship with Fujifilm to sell a rebadged version of the JetPress 720s sheet fed digital press. Heidelberg was also doing its best to build online subscription models for customer service and support.

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