The Weekly Verdigris Blog by Laurel Brunner

This article was produced by the Verdigris project, an industry initiative intended to raise awareness of print’s positive environmental impact. This weekly commentary helps printing companies keep up to date with environmental standards, and how environmentally friendly business management can help improve their bottom lines. Verdigris is supported by the following companies: Agfa Graphics, EFI, Fespa, HP, Kodak, Kornit, Ricoh, Spindrift, Splash PR, Unity Publishing and Xeikon.

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Spreading the sustainability message - Part 3

Laurel-2018.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

In our first blog on getting industry associations to encourage wider sustainability awareness, we put the three Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, at the top of the list. But sector specific environmental impact and sustainability policy statements need much more. Graphic industry sectors such as newspapers, magazines, book and packaging production really should have robust environmental guidance from their associations. Sadly it’s largely absent from their websites and, even sadder, this is a missed opportunity. A high profile position on the environment helps the graphics industry to take ownership and lead the environmental impact conversation. It’s also useful reference for countering the negativity that is often associated with print in all its forms.

Spreading the sustainability message - Part 2

medium_laurel2015.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

This is the second part of a short series to provide industry associations with some basic ideas for how to encourage sustainability awareness amongst memberships. Environmental sustainability is becoming cool again as named brands, consumer associations, hotels and even banks start following the leads of governments and environmental groups. They’re doing this for commercial as well as sustainability reasons because sustainability messaging resonates with consumers. For people in the printing and publishing industry supply chains, this is especially important. Print still takes the rap for poorly handled waste, so messaging that improves how people use printed communications supports the graphics industry and its long term health, as well as reducing negative environmental impacts.

Spreading the sustainability message - Part 1

medium_2015_Laurel B.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

We’ve heard it from brands, environmental groups, consumer associations and governments and more recently credit card companies. They are all doing a great job at communicating the need to reduce Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions through reduced environmental impacts. But much more could be done and we see a massive opportunity for industry associations to take up the mantra and provide guidelines for their members.

Modern offset presses need special consideration

Laurel-2018.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

It seems so simple, you invest in new technology that’s got a lower carbon footprint and you’re making a more sustainable choice. And achieving a lower carbon footprint is a lot to do with why companies invest in upgraded digital presses, new computer-to-plate systems and even processless plates, such as Kodak’s Sonora. But what are the knock-on environmental effects of new, more sustainable technologies? It’s a problem not only for technology investments, but for everything we do that is intended to be environmentally friendly.

IKEA and plastic straws

medium_laurel2015.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

When big brands start taking action, you know its serious. IKEA and Starbucks recently announced their intentions to do away with plastic straws and this could mark the start of some altogether bolder initiatives. Both companies want to be seen to be doing something about the plastics pollution problem.

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