The Weekly Verdigris Blog by Laurel Brunner

This article was produced by the Verdigris project, an industry initiative intended to raise awareness of print’s positive environmental impact. This weekly commentary helps printing companies keep up to date with environmental standards, and how environmentally friendly business management can help improve their bottom lines. Verdigris is supported by the following companies: Agfa Graphics, EFI, Fespa, HP, Kodak, Kornit, Ricoh, Spindrift, Splash PR, Unity Publishing and Xeikon.

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The European Union’s Ecolabel

medium_Laurel.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

After many years of prognostication the European Union has published its specification for an Ecolabel for products and services, excluding food and pharmaceuticals. This is a voluntary label designed to promote improved environmental performance. The idea is that consumers will choose products and services whose environmental impact on a life cycle basis is reduced. It isn’t clear what the baseline reference is for said reduction though, so this label will probably get used rather as calory labels do: less is better.

Seven Cardinal Innovations for a Sustainable Planet

medium_Laurel_2012.jpegThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

The graphic arts industry often gets slammed for the waste and excess emissions it generates. Yet the printing industry is already implementing the Seven Cardinal Innovations as outlined by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research. This organisation is heavy on research and academics, but has a proactive engagement with industry and governments. From what we can tell, there isn’t much interaction with print, which is a pity because print and paper are proactive players for reduced environmental impacts. Of the seven innovations print and paper is already implementing two of them.

Deinking Drama

medium_Laurel_2012.jpegThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

It seems we rather hit a nerve with last week’s blog which isn’t so very surprising. That’s the trouble with blogging: not much room to develop an argument or adequately cover all sides of a problem. The blog’s purpose had been to highlight the dangers of denigrating digital printing on the basis that it isn’t deinkable. The fact that some print is suitable for most recycling processes and some very isn’t, is too nuanced for most media consumers. Consumers tend to look for guiltfree convenience and as a rule don’t appreciate the differences of imaging technologies and inks.

Deinking Myths & Magic

medium_Laurel_2012.jpegThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

Let’s be clear: consumers don’t care about how materials get recycled, as long as they can be recycled. The important point for all of us in the printing industry is that anything corrosive to the credibility of printed paper recycling undermines the industry’s longterm survival. Challenging the recyclability of digital prints damages the credibility of print’s sustainability, in every sense of the word.

Benny & the Jets?

medium_Laurel.jpgThe weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner

The indefatigable Benny Landa is on the road to promote his Nanograpic printing technology, an amazing implementation of piezo inkjet. This technology is set (according to Benny) to revolutionise the printing industry, creating a new category of print that has all the benefits of conventional offset, but with a substantially reduced environmental impact. The arguments for short run colour print produced on demand are well established in terms of sustainability. But what is interesting about the Landa technology is the fact that it started life as an energy source.

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